What do you think about Woz's concerns over cloud computing?

tganley

I'm the first to concede that Steve Wozniak is smarter and more knowledgeable about pretty much anything that has "compute" in its name. Woz apparently has some serious doubts about cloud computing, to the point that he thinks that there are going to "be a lot of horrible problems in the next five years." It seems his main concern is lack of control and ownership. It seems to me that that can be addressed through either contract terms or, horror, even legislation. Then again, I'm not one of the founders of Apple, so may Woz knows something more than I do about this. What do you think, is Wozniak right about the cloud? Are we going to face "horrible problems?"

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jimlynch
Vote Up (16)

There are pluses and minuses to everything, including cloud computing. Users need to be aware of the terms of use for a cloud service before they trust it with their data. Some folks may opt out of using the cloud for much of anything, and that's fine.

I am somewhat skeptical of legislation because the government will often cause more headaches later on down the road for users by passing laws that have unintended consequences. I'd much rather that the providers of cloud services act on their own to allay user fears and issues. If they don't then they run the risk of losing business, and having the government come in and "fix" the problems for them.

Woz tends to be a bit of a loose cannon at time, but it's good that he's speaking out. It may motivate cloud companies to improve their offerings as quickly as possible.

TheCount
Vote Up (13)

 

My guess is that Mat Honen would concede that maybe Wozniak has a point.  

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/118941-Hackers-Use-Amazon-to-C...

 

becker
Vote Up (11)

I think that he has a valid point to some degree, but let's face it, for years many User Agreements have forced end users to cede significant control to software companies.  Ever read those pages of small print?  You don't have many legal rights left after you click the "ok" box.  

 

Sure, it is a little different with the cloud because of the lack of physical ownership of the hardware, but not all that different.  For enterprise users there are cloud options that are different that the consumer oriented offerings - a private or hybrid cloud could address much of Wozniak's concern.  I suppose I have on slightly rosier glasses than Woz when it comes to the cloud.    

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